(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Flora Indica Vol-I"

Jt                                              FLORA   INDICA.
explain the principles by which they are guided in the execu-
tion of similar works to this.
4.  An historical summary of the labours of otir predecessors
in Indian botany, whether as authors or collectors, and some
account of the materials at our disposal.
5.  A sketch of the meteorology and climate of India, the
excessive complexity of whose seasons offers the most formi-
dable obstacle to the student's appreciation of the prominent
features of its vegetation.
,6. An attempt to divide the area emoraccd in the Flora
Indica into physico-geographical or geographico-botanical dis-
tricts. This is intended to serve the double purpose of giv-
ing a slight sketch of the physical characters and vegetation
of these provinces, and of adopting such a carefully-selected
system of nomenclature, as shall be available for assigning
intelligible localities to the species in the body of the Flora,
and such as may be easily committed to memory, or found
with little trouble on any map. We have long deplored the
defective geographical nomenclature adopted in almost every
work treating of the Natural History of India, and the fact
that "E. Ind." or "Ind. Or." is considered in most cases nuf-
ciently definite information as to the native place of any pro-
duction -found between Ceylon and Tibet, or Cabul aiul Sin-
gapur f and we hope that the present attempt to remedy so
important a defect will be received with indulgence.
I. Object, scope, and design of the Flora Indica.
Our object, in the work here commenced, is to prcwnt n
systematic accoxint of the vegetable productions of Britiah
India, arranged according to natural principles, and baaed upon
a careful examination of all the materials within our reach.
Besides the descriptions of the Orders, Genera, and SIXXHCH, all
matters-of importance connected with anatomical, ntructurul,
norpl'&ol jgical, and physiological points* will, wherever it is
practicable, be treated of, and in other cases pointed out aw